Quidditch brings some magic to collegiate sports

By
April 6, 2012

College campuses across the country have brought Quidditch to life, a game of flying broomsticks featured in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series.

Quiddich, a fictional sport involving flying broomsticks from the Harry Potter book series, is becoming an popular real-life pastime on college campuses throughout the country. (Source: Flickr)

“I feel like we have a big Harry Potter fan base,” said Mills sophomore Samantha Curran. However, “if you’re a true Harry Potter fan, you wouldn’t want Quidditch to come to life.”

Curran feels that bring Quidditch into the real world would ruin the magic of the game.

There is an International Quidditch Association (IQA) that has been hosting World Cups since 2009. Many colleges participate, including University of California, Berkeley and Stanford. The IQA has three main goals: Creativity, Community, and Competition. Some teams even host read-a-thons and play charity games.

Students are making a few adjustments to the game, namely, addressing the fact that humans are unable to fly. In the real world Quidditch games, students run around with brooms between their legs. Also the snitch, the infamous flying, golden orb, coveted by Harry Potter himself, is a human being instead of an inanimate object.

The best way to describe how Quidditch is played in the real world is a combination of tag, basketball, dodgeball, all with the addition of a broomstick. The object of the game is to score the most points and catch the snitch.

For the tag aspect of the game, there is one person designated on each team trying to catch the snitch.

The snitch is a person who has a small ball attached to his or her shorts, like in flag football. As the snitch runs around the field, the designees try to rip the ball from his or her shorts.

Three or more players on each team are trying to throw balls through a hoop, much like basketball, which is basically a large ring on a stick, thus representing the magical sport’s “Quaffle.”

A real life representation of the “Bludgers” from the fantasy game are represented by three or more players on each team throw a foam ball at the opposing team. The goal is to knock out the other team’s ball during their attempt to throw the ball through the hoop, resulting in a point.

Some fans have accepted the playing of Quidditch outside of the Harry Potter novels and movies.

“I would be all for it because I grew up with Harry Potter,” said Mills sophomore Maribel Garcia. “Last semester the (typo?) half the volleyball team thought about creating a Quidditch team, so there are people interested.”

Part of why Quidditch has gained popularity on college campuses, and even at the K-12 level, is because of the unique aspects of the game that spice up the common sports that exist today.

“I think Quidditch at Mills would be a fun alternative from your typical NCAA sport and a great way to exercise while meeting with fellow Harry Potter fans,” said sophomore Mariah Taylor, who owns every Harry Potter book and movie.

The Harry Potter book series became popular during the elementary years of many of today’s college students. The first book came out in 1997 and the final books of the series came out in 2007. This book has become embedded in the culture of 90’s babies, and the product of that obsession is coming to life today.


Quidditch brings some magic to collegiate sports was published on April 6, 2012 in Sports & Health

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