Benefits of procrastination

By
September 26, 2002

Procrastination- is it bad? I personally don’t think so. Many professors argue it’s bad and encourage us to begin a project way ahead of the deadline and not to wait to start until the last minute.

But I challenge that argument. What is so bad about hustling and bustling at the last minute? I have come to terms with this fault of mine that many look down upon. Let me tell you why, because, unlike others, I find that my “fault” has its benefits.

First, when I procrastinate and wait until the last minute, for example to write a paper, I find myself very focused on that paper. All my energy is put into that paper. However, if I were to begin a paper about two to three weeks prior to its deadline, I would be sitting down in front of my laptop, day-dreaming about everything and anything completely unrelated to the topic at hand.

I have to stay interested in whatever I’m doing at all times. Why am I interested in my paper last minute? Because it’s due in two days. That will keep me interested. But try to keep me interested two weeks before the deadline? It won’t happen.

I must say that pressure will help me focus. It’s horrible at the time, but it does wonders for deadlines. Pressure equals undivided attention for me.

Second, procrastination allows me to eliminate the unnecessary. The boundaries of what is needed and just superfluous are clearly defined in the late hours of the night. If I were to begin the project ahead of time, I would make too many changes because I would never be satisfied. I would constantly think there is so much more I could do. And really, we all need to know when enough is enough.

Crunch time is the time when we find out that what we have is good. We are direct with what we have and we don’t fuss over it. What we have is exactly what is needed. Doubtless, there is more than likely no time to change anything or do more research, but nevertheless, we have what we need and will deliver what was promised.

Third, procastination does not have a completely horrible outcome. All the procrastinators I know will and do get the job done. Procastinators are not rare because many are procrastinators. Why? Because no matter what, they know their capabilities and know that the job will get done.

Since we know whatever we’re supposed to do will get done, then there are no worries. Whoever complained about a procastinator who didn’t get the job done? Procrastinators get what they are told and handed in. Sometimes it gets turned in late, but turned in nevertheless.

I say, procrastinators be proud. You do a good job no matter what.


Benefits of procrastination was published on September 26, 2002 in Opinions

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