Age difference separates friends

By
October 3, 2002

For friends who are 20 and 21, the age gap can seem huge. Robin, who just turned 21, can now experience exciting nightlife with limitless possibilities. Poor Mari is only 20.

The pull of the dozens of clubs and bars previously denied to Robin are causing a rift in weekend night plans.

You can drive across the bridge and enter the realm of club wonderland. If you have the money, you can go wherever you want.

Most of the big dance clubs in the city have a $10-20 cover, and many of the little romantic date bars in North Beach will cost you seven or eight bucks for a cocktail.

Staying in the East Bay may lead to fewer options in terms of dance clubs, but there are many bars to choose from.

Going out with friends of all ages requires some maneuvering, illegal or not.

But just as there are places in SF that still let you smoke inside, there are bars that just don’t ID. (However, we have yet to come across a bar that doesn’t card and lets you smoke inside at the same time).

Bars that don’t ID are hard to find, and often have an older crowd, and thus don’t feel a need to card.

If there are parties, at Mills or elsewhere, things are a lot easier. People don’t usually card at private parties. Other places that don’t require an ID to enter, where you can drink, include concerts, shows, movies and restaurants.

If you aren’t set on the drinking, just the getting in, these types of places are your best bet. However, because of their nature, they may be more expensive, and not suitable for your average Friday night.

To state the obvious, or perhaps not, we don’t have to spend every moment together, and occasionally we split up for a night.

Solving at least for that night the problem of being 21 or not. But when we want to hang out together, young and old, it can be a real trial.


Age difference separates friends was published on October 3, 2002 in Opinions

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