Modern music deserves more credit

By
February 26, 2004

Dear Editor,

In response to the ‘Miko on the Mic’ column published in the
last edition of The Weekly, I would like to say a few
words.

First of all, I think Miko needs to work on understanding what a
love song actually is before she jumps the gun. I’m not so sure
that the words “my milkshake brings all the boys to the yard” were
written to convey true love. And, hey, my milkshake may be better
than yours, but at least I can clearly see that there’s no deep
meaning to that funky pop song.

From statements made in the column, I’m assuming the author also
believes ‘I’m a Slave for You’ and ‘Lets Get Dirty’ are love songs
as well? Sorry to burst your bubble, but I don’t think these were
intended to be love ballads.

“What’s wrong with music today? Songwriters. None exist who live
and love in honesty,” writes Miko. So, if I may clarify, you’re
saying that songwriters of today are dishonest? I happen think it’s
the other way around. The fact is that most pop/rap songs are
overly honest. “I’m into having sex I’m not into making love.” If
that’s not honesty then I’m not sure what is. “Man she’s so stacked
and she know that I want that… I like the way you do that right
thur.” I’m sorry that the latter may be offensive to some people,
but it’s hard pressed to say that these songwriters are being
anything but honest.

Whether or not they are talking about love is a different story.
If your looking for love songs in those messages, I suggest you try
and look somewhere else.

You may not relate well to lyrics in these songs, but don’t be
quick to say that others do not as well. I like to shake that
monkey and hang out at the Holiday Inn. And if it’s my birthday, I
just might find myself in da club.

All in all, there ARE a lot of really great love songs out
there. Tell me that “everyone falls in love sometimes, sometimes
it’s wrong and sometimes it’s right” isn’t a message we can all
relate to.

I’m not sure what’s in your music collection, but if your
looking for love songs try some new Dire Straits, Tom Petty, Van
Morrison or Jack Johnson. I’m pretty sure that 50 Cent’s new album
isn’t intended to be chock-full of songs about heartbreaks.

In conclusion, love songs of today do “really talk about love”,
but you’re just looking for them on the wrong station. Try rock or
country. Lose the hard rap.

Veronica Orth,

Freshwoman


Modern music deserves more credit was published on February 26, 2004 in Letters to the Editor

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